Skip to main content
Login to CatLink
Future Students

Apply online or check the status of your Admissions application:

Admission Portal

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION.

B.S. Degree in Business Administration
Minor in Business Administration

Business Degree – Bachelor of Science (BS) in Business Administration with Eight Concentrations

Prepare to succeed in a career in the world of business

Careers and futures in the business world have never been brighter and earning a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration from Catawba College is a key way you can prepare to shine in that world. Our mission is to prepare our business degree students for workplace success, whether in a small organization or large corporation, through a strong curriculum based on experiential learning, industry and job relevancy, and curriculum relevance. We place an emphasis on emerging growth sectors and technologies that are driving the global economy.

logo-acbsp.png

Small classes, inspiring and informed faculty, up-to-date technology resources, and an excellent network of regional experiential learning and internship opportunities are just a few of the reasons that U.S. News ranks Catawba College #4 among the Best Regional Colleges in the South. Colleges of Distinction also cites Catawba College and its Business programs as noteworthy for demonstrating the distinctions of Engaged Students, Great Teaching, a Vibrant Community, and Successful Outcomes.

Catawba’s Business degree program is accredited by the Accreditation Council of Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP) which means that the courses we teach, the way we teach them, and the resources we provide to students in Catawba’s Ketner School of Business adhere to business world best practices. It also means that our faculty are constantly assessing and improving their teaching styles and their curricula to stay in sync with the latest trends and cycles in business.

Students who pursue the B.S. Business Administration major at Catawba must choose from one of these eight concentrations:

 

Minor in Business Administration (for majors in non-business disciplines only)

Catawba offers a minor in Business Administration.


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS

The Business Administration Bachelor of Science degree program at Catawba College offers the choice of eight concentrations: Accounting, Communication, General Management, Economics, Entrepreneurship, Information Systems, International Business, and Marketing. 

All students pursuing business-related degrees in the Ketner School of Business are required to complete an internship, and any opportunity for students to gain hands-on experience, even through service learning, is encouraged. Business degree students also benefit from a strong mentorship program established by the Ketner School of Business faculty with Catawba Business alumni and supportive regional business partners. A variety of programs and professional enrichment activities are provided over the course of the year and organized through the normal function of upper administration – including guest and honorary lectures, social events, business mixers, and organized visits with alumni.

Additionally, all business program faculty provide continuous individualized advising with a strictly controlled system of registration, all designed to help business program majors complete their degree programs expeditiously.

Catawba College Students in Ketner Hall
Business Scholarships.

New and transfer, full-time day students seeking to major in one of Catawba’s Business Degree programs may be eligible for a Business Scholarship. The application deadline for consideration is April 1st and applications are available online.

Catawba College Student Chase Loudin Interning at Staples
Internships in Business.

It is through internships at various corporations, companies and non-profit organizations that Catawba College business majors gain professional skills and beef up their resumes. Recently, Catawba business undergraduates have completed successful internships at Rowan Helping Ministries, KMPG, Philip Morris International in Poland, B/E Aerospace, and Staples. Business majors are eligible to apply for the Ketner School of Business Internship Fund to receive up to a $1,000 stipend to cover expenses while they complete an unpaid summer internship.

Catawba College Graduate Shannon Morton '17 studying abroad in Cambodia
Study Abroad in Business.

Travel components of recent business courses have taken Catawba College students to Japan to explore business culture and the culture of music, and to Israel to explore entrepreneurial culture and mindset. Catawba College students pursuing a bachelor’s degree in business have also arranged their own semester abroad experiences to Cambodia and Panama. Business majors may also apply to receive a Ketner School of Business Travel Award to assist with costs associated with a study abroad experience, if the experience will significantly enhance a student’s educational objectives. Study abroad scholarship amounts vary based on applications received and merit.

Catawba College Business Student Presenting Research
Undergraduate Research in Business.

Catawba College students pursuing a business degree program regularly make research presentations regarding varied aspects of business at the state, regional and national conferences of Future Business Leaders of America – Phi Beta Lambda (FBLA-PBL). These FBLA-PBL presentation events are challenging and require research, a written synopsis and oral presentation in front of many judges, but Catawba business majors typically are among the top-place finishers.  Business majors also compete in events at FBLA-PBL conferences that test their business knowledge and skills.

Related Bachelor Degree Programs

Outcomes

block-student5.jpg


BUSINESS DEGREE JOBS.

Business Administration majors from Catawba College are shaping the business world in the following positions:

  • CPA
  • Financial Advisor
  • Software Support Analyst
  • Web Developer
  • Search Engine Optimization Specialist
  • Human Resource Manager
  • Banker
  • Small Business Owner
 
block-student13.jpg


GRADUATE SCHOOLS.

Graduate schools enrolling Catawba College Business majors:

    • UNC-Charlotte
    • N.C. State University
    • UNC-Chapel Hill

 

co-rafalbaran.png

"I traveled 5,000 miles to get an education from the Ketner School of Business and I have never regretted that. A tailored curriculum, together with classes made of individual and group work, perfectly prepare one for graduate school and for professional life.

"The amazing accounting program, which I have been concentrating on, allowed me to get my first-choice internship and be accepted into every graduate school I applied. Thank you KSOB!"

Rafal Baran '16
Business Graduate (Accounting); International Student; Member of the Men's Swimming Team; Member of the Student Managed Investment Fund (SMIF), DAS, International Club, and Business Honor Society

Business Facilities

CEED Lab
(Entrepreneurship and Experiential Development)

Digital
Media 
Lab

Info Systems Lab
(KH 304)

smif2018.jpg

PARTICIPATE.

Prepare for your foray into the business world by developing leadership skills through joining the Future Business Leaders of America - Phi Beta Lambda organization, the world’s largest collegiate business career student organization; the Business Honor Society; the American Marketing Association; the International Club; or Catawba’s own Student Managed Investment Fund.

Faculty

Dr. Eric R. Hake

Dr. Eric R. Hake is Professor of Economics and Interim Dean of the Ketner School of Business. He teaches Macroeconomics, Monetary Theory, and Economics History. He serves as secretary to The Association for Evolutionary Economics (AFEE), an international organization of economists and other social scientists devoted to analysis of economics as evolving, socially constructed and politically governed systems. AFEE publishes the Journal of Economic Issues (JEI).

Dr. Stephen Hiatt

Dr. Stephen Hiatt is a Professor of Business teaches classes in Management, Marketing, and Information Systems at Catawba. His business employment history includes opening stores for a new business start-up in Mesa, Arizona that involved training managers and designing operating procedures, and work as a health & beauty aids buyer for Associated Grocers of Arizona.  A U.S. Air Force veteran, he has taught at Arizona State, Golden Gate University, Park College, the University of Northern Colorado and Kearney State College (now the University of Nebraska at Kearney). 

Dr. Renee A. Just

Dr. Renee A. Just, Assistant Professor of Business and Director of the Center for Entrepreneurship and Experiential Development (CEED), teaches courses in the Entrepreneurship concentration of the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration degree.  She recently traveled abroad to Israel with her students to study that country’s entrepreneurial culture and mindset.

Dr. Darin Spencer, CPA

Dr. Darin Spencer, CPA, Chair and Assistant Professor of Accounting teaches Accounting Principles, Advanced Accounting, and Managerial Finance.

Karen Gaskill

Assistant Professor of Accounting Karen Gaskill

Yan S. Gibson, CPA, MMPA

Assistant Professor of Accounting Yan S. Gibson, CPA, MMPA

Dr. James “Jamie” W. Slate

Dr. James “Jamie” W. Slate, Associate Professor of Economics, teaches Microeconomics, Business and Economics Statistics and Environmental Economics and has research interests in Firm Behavior and Business History.  When not teaching, he is a dedicated rocker who enjoys playing guitar and performing his original tunes at local venues in the Salisbury area.

Dr. Pamela Thompson

Dr. Pamela Thompson, Associate Professor of Information Systems, teaches Applications Programming, Networks and Telecommunications, and Website Design. She serves as a systems designer and consultant.  She serves as faculty advisor for Catawba’s Future Business Leaders of America – Phi Beta Lambda (FBLA-PBL) and delights in the success of Catawba’s business majors who compete at state, regional and national conferences of this organization.

Dr. Sasikarn Cook

Dr. Sasikarn Cook is an Assistant Professor of Marketing at Catawba College. 

Dr. Jennifer Yurchisin

Dr. Jennifer Yurchisin, Visiting Assistant Professor of Marketing

 

Dr. Mahsa Khoshnoud

Dr. Mahsa Khoshnoud is an Assistant Professor of Business and Finance. 

Dr. Josh Smicker

Assistant Professor and Chair of Communication Dr. Josh Smicker’s academic research investigates the use of digital media technologies—including video games, virtual reality, and mobile applications — to justify and expand a move towards the self-management of trauma.  His work connects the ways digital technologies are presented as enabling “post-traumatic growth” to changing representations of trauma in film and television, and to shifts in more general discourses of trauma, crisis, and “resilience.” 

Dr. Scott Morton

Assistant Professor of Communication Dr. Scott Morton is trained as a media historian, has experience in film and video production. His research interests include 20th century propaganda and the history of broadcast radio in the United States. His expertise includes creative writing, sound design, photography, and videography. He has professional experience with public relations, advertising, and computer-based technical support. 

Curriculum

Required Courses for B.S. in Business Administration
Required Courses for B.S. in Business Administration

ACC 1901, 1902 Principles of Accounting I,II

6

ECON 1901, 1902 Principles of Macroeconomics, Principles of Microeconomics

6

ECON 2101 Business and Economic Statistics                     
OR 
MGT 1902 Business Data Analytics

3

FIN 2535 Managerial Finance

3

IS 2501 Management Information Systems

3

MGT 2453 or 2454 Business Law I or II

3

MGT 2501 Principles of Management

3

MGT 2563 Operations Management

3

MGT 2566 Business Ethics

3

MGT 3990 Strategic Management

3

MGT 4401 Experiential Business Learning

3

MKT 2501 Principles of Marketing

3

Areas of Concentration - Selected from: 
• Accounting 
• Communication
• Economics 
• Entrepreneurship
• General Management 
• Information Systems 
• International Business
• Marketing

18

 

Total:

60

Areas of Concentration

Hours

ACCOUNTING CONCENTRATION             
ACC 2501, 2502, Intermediate Accounting I, II             
ACC 2701 Managerial-Cost Accounting             
ACC 2801 Accounting Info Systems & Controls             
ACC 3521 Taxation Accounting             
ACC 3701 Auditing

Total:

6
3
3
3
3

18

COMMUNICATION CONCENTRATION     
CA 1101 Public Speaking 
CA 1110 Introduction to Mass Media 
CA 2255 Writing for Media 
CA 3260 Media Law and Ethics 
Electives in Communications

Total:


3
3
3
3
6

18

ECONOMICS CONCENTRATION               
ECON 2401 Comparative Economic Systems               
ECON 2901 Money & Banking               
ECON 3401 Environmental Economics               
ECON 3901 International Economics 
Electives in Business at 2000 level or above

Total:

3
3
3
3
6

18

ENTREPRENEURSHIP CONCENTRATION 
ENT 2501 Introduction to Entrepreneurship 
ENT 2510 Entrepreneurial Leadership 
ENT 3501 Financing New Business Ventures 
ENT 3510 Creativity and Innovation 
Electives in Entrepreneurship at 2000 level or above 

ENT2512 Entrepreneurial Marketing 
ENT2513 New Product Development for Entrepreneurs 
ENT2530 Digital Playbook for Entrepreneurs 
ENT2540 Social Entrepreneurship 
ENT3529 Psychology of Business

Total:


3
3
3
3
6





 

18

GENERAL MANAGEMENT CONCENTRATION               
MGT 2562 Human Resource Management               
MGT 2564 Motivation and Leadership               
MGT 2565 Organizational Behavior               
MGT 2902 International Business 
Electives in Business at 2000 level or above

Total:

3
3
3
3
6

18

INFORMATION SYSTEMS CONCENTRATION               
IS 2505 Application Program Development 
IS 2550 Object-Oriented Design and Programming OR IS 2528 Advanced 
Application Program Development 
IS 3510 Introduction to Databases 
IS 3512 Computer Networking and Security 
IS 3514 Web Technologies and Electronic Commerce 
IS 3502 Information Systems Planning and Design 
IS elective 2000 level or above

Total:


3
3

3
3
3
3
3

18

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS CONCENTRATION 
ECON 2401 Comparative Economic Systems 
MGT 2902 International Business OR ECON 3901 International Economics
MGT 2001 International Travel Course
Foreign Language through Intermediate 2 and additional 3000 level Foreign 
Language course
Electives, three additional hours in Foreign Language, Business, or other 
approved course relevant to international focus

Total:


3
3
3
6

3


18

MARKETING CONCENTRATION 
MKT 2502 Consumer Behavior               
MKT 2503 Advertising               
MKT 3120 Sales Management               
MKT 3502 Marketing Research               
MKT 3990 Strategic Marketing               
Electives in Business at 2000 level or above

Total:

 3
3
3
3
3
3

18

Required Courses for Minor
Required Courses for Minor

ACC 1901, 1902 Principles of Accounting I

3

ECON 1901 Principles of Macroeconomics

3

FIN 2535 Managerial Finance

3

MGT 2501 Principles of Management

3

MKT 2501 Principles of Marketing

3

Elective in Business at 2000 level or above

3

 

Total:

18

Course Descriptions
Course Descriptions

Accounting Courses


1901 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING I (3 hours)
A study of the accounting principles with emphasis on the use and analysis of financial information for decisionmaking purposes. 

1902 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING II 
(3 hours)
A continuation of the study of accounting principles from a user's perspective with an introduction to the internal information needs of management. Prerequisite: ACC 1901. 

2501 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I 
(3 hours)
An introduction to the basic accounting process and a study of the theory and valuation of working capital accounts. Prerequisite: ACC 1902 or junior standing.

2502 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II
 (3 hours)
A study of the theory and valuation of non-current assets, long-term liabilities, and stockholder's equity. Prerequisite: ACC 2501.

2701 MANAGERIAL-COST ACCOUNTING  (3 hours)
A study of cost concepts emphasizing job order and process costing, standard costing, direct costing, operating budgets and differential analysis. Prerequisite: ACC 1901.

2801 ACCOUNTING INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND CONTROLS 
(3 hours)
A study of manual and computerized information systems, emphasizing design and organization of a system; information flows; accounting, financial and management controls. Prerequisite: ACC 1901. 

3521 TAXATION ACCOUNTING (3 hours)
A study of the concepts of federal income tax laws and their applications to individual taxpayers and business entities. Prerequisite: ACC 1902. 

3601 ADVANCED ACCOUNTING 
(3 hours)
A study of the accounting issues and reporting requirements relating to partnerships, consolidations, foreign currency, and not-for-profit entities.

3701 AUDITING
 (3 hours)
Fundamentals of auditing procedures and objectives with emphasis on audit reports, internal control, working papers, examination of auditing records, impact of computers on auditing procedures and professional ethics. Prerequisite: ACC 2501 and Junior standing.

4401 INTERNSHIP IN ACCOUNTING (1-6 hours)
An application of theory and methods of specific areas of accounting in a supervised field experience. Prerequisite: permission of Instructor.


Economics Courses

1901 PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS  (3 hours)
A study in the foundations of economic analysis, national income accounting, economic growth, and the public sector, with emphasis on macroeconomics.

1902 PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS (3 hours)
A study of markets, the price systems and allocation of resources, distribution of income, international economy, and perspectives on economic change, with emphasis on microeconomics.

2000 TOPICS IN ECONOMICS (3 hours)
An investigaion of a selected topic of major importance in the field of economics.

2101 BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC STATISTICS (3 hours)
A study of statistical techniques in business and economics, including collection and presentation of business and economic data, measures of control tendencies, dispersion, index numbers, probability, sampling distributions and test of hypotheses. Prerequisite: completion of the Mathematics General Education Requirement (MATH 1132 is highly recommended).

2105 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (3 hours)
A survey of third world regions and countries, their economic growth and development. (Offered only in Evening and Graduate Studies) Prerequisite: ECON 1903E.

2401 COMPARATIVE ECONOMICS SYSTEMS (3 hours)
A study of contemporary economic systems, including capitalism, socialism, and mixed economies. Theoretical foundations of capitalism and socialism are considered, as are actual institutions found in contemporary economies.

2901 MONEY & BANKING (3 hours)
A survey of the monetary and banking systems of the United States, to include problems of money and prices, organization and functioning of commercial banking and the Federal Reserve System, monetary standards, monetary policy, and credit control. Prerequisite: ECON 1901 & 1902.

3101 INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMIC THEORY (3 hours)
A study of the theories of determination, fluctuation, and distribution of national income, with emphasis on employment, money supply, interest rates, price level, and public policy. Prerequisite: ECON 1901 & 1902.

3201 INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMIC THEORY (3 hours)
Astudy of the theory of firms, to include choice and demand, production and supply, perfect and imperfect competition, and pricing the factors of production. Prerequisites: ECON 1901 & 1902.

3401 ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS (3 hours)
An examination of decision-making approaches to environmental resources with emphasis placed on the welfare analysis technique utilized in economics. The topic is presented in light of the economic theories of public goods, market failures, externalities, and economic value. Cost-benefit analysis is incorporated into the study as are alternative methods for valuing environmental resources and human welfare. Prerequisite: ECON 1902.

3901 INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS (3 hours)
A comprehensive analysis of the forces determining international trade, finance, and commercial policy. Prerequisite: ECON 1901 & 1902.

4101 SEMINAR IN ECONOMICS (1-3 hours)
A course designed to afford the student with a minor or a concentration in Economics an opportunity to study an area that is not fully covered in a standard economics course. This is a seminar-style course that requires independent reading, presentations, and open class discussion. Prerequisites: ECON 1901 & 1902 and permissions of Instructor.

4301 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ECONOMICS (1-3 hours)
A self-directed study following a contractual plan initiated by the student and accepted by the staff. Prerequisites: ECON 1901 & 1902.


Entrepreneurship Courses

ENT 2501 INTRODUCTION TO ENTREPRENEURSHIP  (3 hours)
A study in the foundations of entrepreneurship that can be applied to an individual venture, partnership, small business, or (as in intrapreneurship) a large organization.  This course will develop the key elements around creating a business including idea generation, market analysis, business plan development, financing, learning and building an organization.

ENT 2510 ENTREPRENEURIAL LEADERSHIP (3 hours)
This course covers the theory and application of leadership principles and theories for entrepreneurship.  This course exposes the student to the challenges, objectives and skills required to be a leader in an entrepreneurial or intrapreneurial capacity.  Key topics include power, vision, ethical decision-making, teams, and the role followers play in a leader's success.  Prerequisite:  ENT 2501

ENT 2512 ENTREPRENEURIAL MARKETING (3 hours)
Entrepreneurial marketing focuses on the four key marketing drivers for building a business, using the traditional "4P's" marketing framework.  This course emphasizes and develops the elements of a product, place, promotion, and price that are most important for entrepreneurial ventures.

ENT 2513 NEW PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT FOR ENTREPRENEURS (3 hours)
This course will focus on proven constructs, frameworks and approaches for new product development, including insight, analyzing marketing opportunities, segmentation and positioning, concept development, product/service design, testing evaluation and refinement, and launch.

ENT 2530 DIGITAL PLAYBOOK (3 hours)
This course develops the key digital technology elements associated with many entrepreneurial start-ups.  Students learn the fundamental aspects of each element to allow for effective project management.

ENT 2540 SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP (3 hours)
This course focuses on the use of entrepreneurial methods for the resolution of social problems, evaluating a range for profit and non-profit ventures to achieve an identified social good.  The course will frame the concept and context of what "social good" and "social change" is, using a range of real world situations and examples.

ENT 3501 FINANCING NEW BUSINESS VENTURES (3 hours)
This course studies the financing of small and medium size businesses from the perspective of the entrepreneur and investor.  Students will gain an understanding of the unique financial decisions entrepreneurs are faced with compared to other legal forms of business.  Topics include but are not limited to funding and managing finance, valuation, cash flow, private equity options, and recognizable value.  Pre-requisites: ENT 2501 and FIN 2535.

ENT 3510 CREATIVITY AND INNOVATION (3 hours)
This is a course designed to challenge the student's creative and innovative abilities.  This course explores methods and practices drawn from the arts, sciences, and social sciences that are used by innovative and creative individuals to develop initiatives and solve complex managerial or organizational problems.

ENT 3529 PSYCHOLOGY OF BUSINESS (3 hours)
Industrial & Organizational (I/O) Psychology is one of the most important fields of study that bridges the business/psychology topics as it pertains to the workplace.  In this course we will examine theories, strategies, foundations and effects of I/O psychology.  Topics will include, but not be limited to: organizational climate, group problem solving, conflict resolution, and motivation. Prerequisites:  ENT2501 or PSYC1110 or MGT2501 or permission of instructor.


Finance Courses

1137 PERSONAL FINANCE (3 hours)
A study of the personal financial problems of the individual, including budgeting, savings plans, insurance, home buying, taxes, mutual funds, investments, and estate planning.

2535 MANAGERIAL FINANCE (3 hours)
A study of financial management for business firms to include financing and investing decisions. Prerequisite: ACC 1902.

3201 FINANCIAL STATEMENT AND SECURITIES ANALYSIS (3 hours)
A comprehensive analysis of financial statements and securities from an investor's perspective. Prerequisite: FIN 2535.

3402 CAPITAL MARKETS (3 hours)
A comprehensive study of financial markets and institutions including the organization and structure of markets, government and corporate securities, and derivative securities. Prerequisite: FIN 2535.

3536 INVESTMENTS (3 hours)
A study of security valuation and portfolio management including the measurement of return and risk, investigation of security markets, asset valuation, and portfolio construction. Prerequisite: FIN 2535.


Information Systems Courses

1503 INTRODUCTION TO DATA AND PROGRAMMING STRUCTURES (3 hours)
A study of specific data structures (including arrays, records, stacks, queues, and trees) incorporated into ADTs used in creating IS applications, so students will gain an understanding of defining and measuring events that produce both simple and complex data, and principles, concepts and practices of successful, structured software development.

2300 PRODUCTIVITY WITH IS TECHNOLOGY(3 hours)
A practical study of effective and efficient use of packaged software with emphasis on productivity concepts and how to achieve them through functions and features in computer software.

IS 2501 MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3 hours)
A comparison of various sources and uses of information and their interaction: merging of data processing, word processing, and communications for optimal management decision making.

2505 APPLICATION PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT(3 hours)
A study of the design, programming, testing and implementation of information system applications using structured and object-oriented design principles. Programming logic is covered. Same as CS 2505.

2512 HARDWARE AND SYSTEMS SOFTWARE (3 hours)
Acomparison of various sources and uses of information and their A study of hardware/software technology, including tradeoffs in computer architecture for effective use in a business environment, installation and configuration of system architecture for single, central and networked computing systems, as well as single and multiuser operating systems. Same as CS 2512.

2528 ADVANCED APPLICATIONS PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT(3 hours)
A study of advanced principles of structured and object-oriented programming designed to build an interactive and user-friendly business information system, with a focus on advanced use of a programming language for project development and implementation. Prerequisite: IS 2505.

2550 OBJECT-ORIENTED DESIGN AND PROGRAMMING(4 hours) 
A study of object-oriented application development, covering object-oriented analysis, design, and programming using a specific object-oriented language(s) for application development. Mobile application and web development topics are included. Prerequisite: IS 2505. Same as CS 2550.

3502 INFORMATION SYSTEMS PLANNING(3 hours)
Development of a systematic plan for determining a company’s technology needs; the planning cycle, available hardware and software, acquisition considerations, and the selection and implementation of the system. Project management topics are included. Prerequisite: IS 2501.

3510 INTRODUCTION TO DATABASES (3 hours)
This course covers database design, development and the use of database management systems for applications. Data mining and data warehousing topics are introduced. Same as CS 3510.

3512 COMPUTER NETWORKING AND SECURITY (3 hours)
Fundamental principles of networking, including such topics as network analysis, design, implementation, security and management. Prerequisite: IS 2501 OR IS 2505 OR IS 3510 OR MATH 2602. Same as CS 3512.

3514 ELECTRONIC COMMERCE(3 hours)
A study of web technologies including cloud computing, social media, web site development, and search engine optimization for ecommerce and other applications. Students learn to use development tools and languages for web development. Prerequisites: IS 2501 OR CA 2901 OR IS 2505.

4101 INFORMATION SYSTEMS SEMINAR(1-3 hours)
Reading, discussion, and projects on a topic in Information Systems selected by the department. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing. Same as CS 4101.

4201 PRACTICUM IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS(1-6 hours)
An application of theory and methods of specific areas of information systems in a supervised field experience. Prerequisite: permission of Instructor.

4301 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS(1-4 hours)
Self-directed study following a contractual plan initiated by the student and accepted by the instructor. Prerequisite: permission of Department Chair.


Management Courses

1901 COMPARATIVE BUSINESS CULTURES (3 hours)
An examination of social and business customs in selected regions of the world. (Offered only in Evening and Graduate Studies.)

1902 Business Data Analytics (3 hours)
Descriptive and inferential calculations, hypothesis testing, model building, decision trees, forecasting, correlation, simulation, ANOVA, and linear regression.

2000 TOPICS IN BUSINESS (1-3 hours)
An investigation of a selected topic of major importance in the field of business.

2001 INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL COURSE (3 hours)
This course involves international travel and study and is a required component of the International Business Concentration of the Bachelor of Science Business Administration Degree.

2451 LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF BUSINESS (3 hours)
A study of various aspects of policy making, restraints of trade, anti-trust policies, price discrimination, legalized agreement, restrictions of competition, and general influence of government on business.

2453 BUSINESS LAW I (3 hours)
An introduction to the legal system as it applies to commercial transactions and a study of the substantive law of contracts.

2454 BUSINESS LAW II (3 hours)
A study of the substantive law of agency, negotiable instruments, property, and business entities.

2501 PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT (3 hours)
An examination of major concepts, theories and practices in business management, with emphasis on planning, decision-making, basic organizational structures, motivation and leadership styles.

2562 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (3 hours)
An examination of major concepts, theories and practices in personnel management, with emphasis on job evaluation, selection and placement, employee development, employee relationships and industrial relations. Prerequisite: MGT 2501.

2563 OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT (3 hours)
An introduction to the concepts involved in managing the operations and production function. Course will include quantitative approaches to topics such as scheduling. Prerequisites: MGT 1902 or ECON 2101, MGT 2501.

2564 MOTIVATION AND LEADERSHIP (3 hours)
A study of the theories of motivation and leadership in relation to management processes. Prerequisite: MGT 2501.

2565 ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR (3 hours)
A study of managerial consequences of behavioral concepts such as motivation, communication, leadership, organizational structure, and decision-making, to provide the framework needed for the understanding, prediction and control of human behavior in organizations. Prerequisite: MGT 2501.

2566 BUSINESS ETHICS (3 hours)
A consideration of the major ethical theories that guide human and business behavior. Topics will include ethical issues in advertising, product safety, pursuit of profits, employee rights, treatment of workers, effects on the environment, use of natural resources, and multinational operations. Prerequisite: MGT 2501 or permission of Instructor.

2601 BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS (3 hours)
A study of the nature of and problems of individual, interpersonal, and organizational communications in business. Techniques from oral presentation, the writing process, and technology will be developed. (Offered only in Evening and Graduate Studies.)

2602 MANAGEMENT OF SMALL BUSINESS (3 hours)
An examination of the methods and strategies for successfully managing the growth and transitional stages of an existing small business. Prerequisite: MGT 2501.

2902 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS (3 hours)
An introduction to international business with special emphasis on the environmental and cultural issues facing global organizations. Prerequisite: MGT 2501.

3990 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT (3 hours)
An integrative capstone course examining the setting of strategic objectives, developing corporate strategies, and translating objectives and strategies into current operational plans. Prerequisites: MKT 2501, FIN 2535, MGT 2501, Senior Standing.

4201 SEMINAR (3 hours)
Reading, discussion, independent research and written reports on a topic selected by the department. Prerequisite: permission of Instructor.

4301 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (1-3 hours)
Self-directed study following a contractual plan initiated by the student and accepted by the staff. Prerequisite: permission of Chair.

4401 EXPERIENTIAL BUSINESS LEARNING (1-6 hours)
A reality-based, outside-of-the-classroom experience, under the supervision of a faculty member. This experience may include practicum, internship, service learning, study abroad, computer simulation, or other similar approved experience. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Same as CA 4401 and CS 4401.


Marketing Courses

2501 PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING (3 hours)
A study of the marketing environment; marketing, planning and information; market segmentation; buyer behavior; strategies for product distribution, promotion, and pricing; societal issues, service, nonprofit and international marketing. Online only.

2502 CONSUMER BEHAVIOR (3 hours)
A study of factors that influence the decision to purchase a product or service to include both the consumer and industrial sectors. Prerequisite: MKT 2501.

2503 ADVERTISING (3 hours)
A study of advertising issues in both traditional and electronic environments, to include policy formulation, promotional activities, agency selection, and analysis. Prerequisites: MKT 2502.

3120 SALES MANAGEMENT (3 hours)
A study of sales management issues in both traditional and electronic environments, to include planning and implementing sales strategies; developing and leading the sales organization; budgeting and statistical analysis. Prerequisites: MGT 1902.

3502 MARKETING RESEARCH (3 hours)
A study of techniques and methodologies of market research, including case method and/or computer simulation. Prerequisite: MGT 1902.

3990 STRATEGIC MARKETING (3 hours)
An integrative capstone course examining strategic and operational marketing issues in both traditional and electronic environments. Computer simulations and gaming models are utilized to translate strategies into current operational plans. Prerequisite: MKT 3502.